What Happens To The Body When You Stop Drinking

“This is a good place,” he said.
“There’s a lot of liquor,” I agreed.”
― Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises

Too much of drinking can causes hypertension (blood pressure) which may lead to stroke, Sexual problems, Cancer, Stomach problems, Osteoporosis in men and women both. It also becomes the reason for obesity, as it contains an excess of calories. Giving up alcohol is quite tough even for a person not addicted to it. But as Denise Hildreth has said:

“Some things just couldn’t be protected from storms. Some things simply needed to be broken off…Once old thing were broken off, amazingly beautiful thing could grow in their place.” 

But once it is overcome by a person, the body undergoes through a shocking metamorphosis. The pictures in this article are gonna show you the before and after consequences of drinking too much and giving it up.

Take a look at these pictures and see what happens to you body when you booze up too much:

1. 7 months sober

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2. 1 Year sober

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3. 1 Year

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4. This couple had 3 Years, 4 months 17 days of abstinence together

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5. 3 months and 1 week

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6. 5 years of abstinence

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7. 1 year sober

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8. 3 months and 5 days

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9. 7 months sober

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10. 8.5 months abstinent

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11. 1 year of abstinence

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12. 1 year of abstinence

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13. 5 years of sobriety

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14. 1 year 5 months of abstinence turned her into a beautiful woman

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15. 5 months of abstinenceimg_0087-5818dce18ee96__605

You have tried boozing up. But now try to give it up. The world will look more beautiful :)

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Kate Moss’s relationship might be in trouble

London, Sep 19| Supermodel Kate Moss’s relationship with her boyfriend Count Nikolai von Bismarck is reportedly on the rocks.

According to a source, Moss has kicked Bismarck out of her home in North London because of his party lifestyle, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

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“Kate is furious as she really thought he had got his act together recently,” the source told The Sun newspaper.

“They’d both gone a few months without drinking but he’s been as bad as ever over the past few weeks,” the source added.

The source shared that Moss is keen to withhold her relationship.

“Nikolai left (her house) with just a bag. Kate is trying to give him some tough love. She hopes it will work as she doesn’t want to split from him, but he might leave her with no other choice,” the source added.

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Quitting alcohol easier than trying to control drinking

London, Sep 15| People who aim to quit drinking entirely are more likely to achieve this goal if they are treated by a care provider who advocates total abstinence, a new study suggests.

According to the study, those who want to control their drinking or reduce the amount of alcohol they consume are likely to be less successful even when guided by a care provider.

“Instead patients whose goal was total abstinence were more successful than those who had chosen to control their drinking,” said Kristina Berglund, Associate Professor at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

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Published study suggested that people with alcohol dependence can learn to control their drinking.

Previous studies have shown that the crucial factor in treatment success is that patients and care providers have the same view and that the choice of treatment method plays a subordinate role. But it has not been found out that what is the extent of influence of ones’s choice on the final outcome of treatment.

For the study, published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, the researchers followed up 201 adult patients for 2.5 years after the onset of treatment . It showed that a shared view between patient and care provider was not decisive for the treatment outcome.

Around 90 per cent of patients who were in agreement with their care provider on total abstinence were still sober at the follow-up, whereas only 50 per cent, who were in agreement with their care provider on controlled consumption treatment, had succeeded in controlling their drinking at follow-up.

“Our study shows that regardless of agreement on goals and methods, in the end it is more difficult to stick to controlled drinking than to give it up entirely,” Berglund added.

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