Legends Behind celebrating Goverdhan Pooja And Bhaiya Dhooj Legends Behind celebrating Goverdhan Pooja And Bhaiya Dhooj
Since the week of festivals is spicing up everyone’s life, we thought we would explain the reasons behind celebrating some of these festivals. Most... Legends Behind celebrating Goverdhan Pooja And Bhaiya Dhooj

Since the week of festivals is spicing up everyone’s life, we thought we would explain the reasons behind celebrating some of these festivals. Most of the people tend to wonder why these festivals exist, SO we are presenting you some legends behinds these festivals as well as the rituals of ceremonies.

Goverdhan Pooja

Goverdhan pooja is a Hindu festival. It is the fourth day of Diwali celebrations called ‘Padwa’ or ‘Varshapratipada litereally means first day of the new year. It is a segment of the four day festival also called Annakot which is a translated form of “a mountain of food.” This day is celebrated to remember the victory of Lord Krishna over Indra Dev, who is considered as the custodian of Swarga (heaven), rains and thunderstorms.

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Legend behind the celebration

The legends of Vishnupuran states that people used to worship Lord Indra in order to please him because they believ that it is lord Indra who gives rain but Krishna taught people to worship Goverdhan hill and nature. He suggested the dwellers of Vrindavan that it is nature that is nurturing us not Indra. So we should adore Goverdhan hill as a part of nature. Then people started following the words of Krishna, which made Indra annoyed and he punished people with his thunderous rain. Krishna in order to save the lives of people lifted the Goverdhan hill and protected the people of Mathura. It is a metaphorical representation of God saving his devotees and depicts the significance of nature. It also marks a very important shift from worshipping the Vedic Gods to the avatars of Vishnu.

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Rituals of Clebration

On this auspicious day people prepare a figure of Krishna and the a small mountain of cow dung symbolizing Goverdhan hill and decorate it with flowers. Then after offering sweets and delicious dishes, people circumambulate around it and sing.

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Bhaiya Dooj

Bhaiya Dooj is the last fifth day of Diwali festival also known as other names such as: Bhau Beej in Goa, Maharashtra and Karnataka; Bhai Tika in Nepal, Bhathru Dwithiya, Bhau-deej, Bhai Phota in Bengal, and Ningol Chakuba in Manipur and as Bhai Tika in Nepal.

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Legends Behind Bhaiya Dooj

1. The tale of Krishna

As per a prevalent Hindu traditions and history, Krishna had returned to her sister, Subhadra, after slaying the demon, Narkasur. His sister gave gave him a hearty welcome with sweets flowers and by applying tilak on Krishna’s forehead.

2. The story of Yamraj

Another explanation of the origin of the festival involves Yama, the custodian of dharma and death. Yama punishes people who dont follow the rules for the individuals and society. The day after Diwali, Yamaraj, the God of death, paid a visit to his dear sister Yami (Yamuna), who received him by aarti and tilak ceremony. She then offered him delicious dishes to eat and Yamraj presented her a unique gift as a symbol of his affection and concern towards sister. That is why this day is also known as the Yama Dwitiya.

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Rituals of celebration

The ceremony of this day is almost same as the other Indian festival Rakshabandhan. Sisters perform aarti for their brother, apply red tika on their brother’s forehead, which is a sign of prayer for long and happy life of brothers. Then brother’s favourite dish or sweet is offered by sisters. In return brothers give them some gifts with affection. The  ceremony denotes the commitment of a brother to preserve his sister as well as a sister’s blessings and love for her brother.

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